Architecture in the University

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The study of architecture in the College of Arts & Sciences is focused around a six-semester core of sequential design studios with an optional Senior Honors Thesis.

 

ARCH 102: Introduction to Design

As the first course in the six-semester cumulative sequence of required design studios, ARCH 102 focuses on orthogonal geometry, orthographic and axonometric projection and digital fabrication. In ARCH 201, the design studio following ARCH 102, students explore the non-orthogonal geometries of animate form as the basis for the development of analogical and prototypical structures. Learn more

 

ARCH 201: Design Fundamentals I

As the second course in the six-semester cumulative sequence of required design studios, ARCH 201 is preceded by ARCH 102, an exploration of orthogonal geometry and orthographic and axonometric projection. ARCH 201 focuses on the non-orthogonal geometries of animate form as the basis for the development of analogical and prototypical structures utilizing 3D digital modeling software and digital fabrication. In ARCH 202, the design studio following ARCH 201, students explore the movement of the body as a basis for design. Learn more

 

ARCH 202: Design Fundamentals II

As the third course in the six-semester cumulative sequence of required design studios, ARCH 202 is preceded by ARCH 201, an exploration of the non-orthogonal geometry of animate form. ARCH 202 focuses on the mapping of the human body’s movement during a specific activity as a frame of reference for the design a site-specific space-enclosing structure. In ARCH 301, the design studio following ARCH 202, students explore intersecting geometries. Learn more

 

ARCH 301: Design I

As the fourth course in the six-semester cumulative sequence of required design studios, ARCH 301 is preceded by ARCH 202, mapping the movement of the human body as a basis for design. ARCH 301 focuses on the investigation of intersecting geometries through a series of exercises culminating in the design of a community performance space. In ARCH 302, the design studio following ARCH 301, students explore the geometry and material qualities of existing constructive assemblies in the development of new spatial and constructional prototypes. Learn more

 

ARCH 302: Design II

As the fifth course in the six-semester cumulative sequence of required design studios, ARCH 302 is preceded by ARCH 301, and exploration of intersecting geometries. ARCH 302 focuses on constructive geometry as a means to explore the connections and potential relationships between geometry and basic techniques of building construction. Students draw and analyze constructive assemblies of precedent buildings as the basis for the development of new spatial and constructional prototypes, which are deployed with variability on a specific site.  In ARCH 401, the design studio following ARCH 302, students design a building in relation to contemporary concepts of geometry in architecture. Learn more

  

ARCH 401: Advanced Design

As the sixth and final course in the six-semester cumulative sequence of required design studios, ARCH 401 is preceded by ARCH 302, an exploration of constructive geometries. ARCH 401 focuses on connections between design and theory, especially in relation to contemporary concepts of geometry explored through the design of a work of architecture with a particular program situated a specific location. Learn more

 

ARCH 498: Honors Thesis (Elective)

A student may apply during the fall term of their fourth year to graduate with Honors in the Major in Architecture. To graduate with Honors a student must successfully complete ARCH 498: Honors Thesis. To be admitted into ARCH498 in the spring semester of the fourth year a student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.5 in required ARCH courses and submit a written thesis proposal on the first Monday in November in the fall semester of their fourth year. The pdf of the proposal should be labelled “ARCH498_last name, first name” and be limited to three 8.5x11 pages including a thesis title, subtitle, description (1-3 paragraphs) and an annotated bibliography.

The subject of the thesis must be specifically related to sociocultural or ecological concerns, or both, and link architecture with another discipline of study within the College of Arts & Sciences. The proposal must include the names, academic rank and email addresses of each of the proposed thesis advisors and explain in 1-3 sentences how the academic or research interests of each advisor relate to the subject of the proposed thesis. For academic year 2020-21, each Honors Thesis is limited to no more than three and no less than two advisors, with at least one in architecture and one in another discipline within the College of Arts & Sciences. Either one of these advisors may be the primary or secondary advisor.

Once the thesis proposal is reviewed and approved by both the Honors Thesis Coordinator and the Undergraduate Chair, a student will be issued a permit to enroll in ARCH498 in the spring term. Students are expected to meet with their primary advisor at least once a week during the spring term. Final requirements in ARCH498 include drawings (analytical, design, or both) as well as a written thesis booklet.  An Honor Thesis may be substantially drawn, but must include some writing, or substantially written, but must include some drawing. Learn more